Clever Carmel creates her own World Cup style: A Book Review

“My hope for this book is that it will bring up questions from mixed-race children exploring their own experience, but also from those children watching.” — Kristen Scott Ndiaye

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What’s in a Bookshelf?: An Afterword

We’re back! And just getting ourselves together from a whirlwind trip. And while I think the experience is more easily conveyed in pictures, I will try my hand at telling you what it was like to build our first multicultural bookshelf from shipping to “plaquing.” Continue reading “What’s in a Bookshelf?: An Afterword”

Building Bookshelves in West Africa — Update!

Hello supporters!

The fun has started: we’re now on the hunt for books to fill the bookshelves! We’ve been in touch with our first school in Thies and are peeling our eyes open for quality children’s books. Watch the video for a short update:

Kristen and Charles

Donate at https://www.gofundme.com/readingculture

Stolen Words: A Book Review

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“Stolen Words by Melanie Florence, an award-winning writer of Cree and Scottish heritage, is a moving and eloquent story about the pain caused by losing language and the importance of reclamation.” Continue reading “Stolen Words: A Book Review”

GoFundMe: Building Bookshelves in West Africa

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Together with my husband, as we prepare for our third family trip to Senegal, West Africa — now with a little one in tow — an image continues to tread in our minds: a school — no, a classroom — a shack, a blackboard, and a shelf…full…of outdated books; but about 15 eager students raising their hands. The image is of excitement for education, hidden in plain sight on the streets of Dakar. That was two years ago, and we haven’t stopped talking about it since. Continue reading “GoFundMe: Building Bookshelves in West Africa”

Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox: A Book Review

Groundwood Logos SpineWhat animal on this Earth do you connect with? Why? Danielle Daniel guides children to answer this question and explains the cultural tradition of the Anishinaabe totem animal in this beautifully illustrated book.

Wearing crafted masks, we hear children explain why they identify with awesome creatures such as a deer, a butterfly or a wolf — a quiz that can be related to by children both inside and outside of the Aboriginal sphere. Continue reading “Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox: A Book Review”

Building an Aboriginal Reading Culture

After a busy week, I’m finally able to update you on what’s been happening! If you follow my Instagram, you probably already know: children gathered from completely different backgrounds last week for Reading Culture‘s multicultural workshop series. I don’t think I could have been more excited to show off my books, Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox by Danielle Daniel, which focuses on the idea of the totem animal in a direct but beautiful way; and Stolen Words by Melanie Florence, which introduced the history of the residential school system — a touchy but necessary conversation.

FE6A8609Sometimes I Feel Like a Fox by Danielle Daniel

Continue reading “Building an Aboriginal Reading Culture”